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Commented On: Payback On Plug-Ins: Finance Commentator Misses The Point


Green Car Reports 0 Views 18 comments
Also, Tesla's battery packs are warranteed for 8yrs, which is intended to represent a 20% drop in useful charge capacity.

Tesla offered an optional battery replacement warrantee for the Roadster ($12k), guaranteeing the entire pack replacement at no additional charge, unless the replacement was needed prior to the end of the warrantee (7yrs. for Roadster, additional $2k charged for every year less than 7). If you needed the replacement after the regular warrantee expires, then Tesla refunds $1k per year beyond 7yrs at the time you replace the pack.

If Tesla does that again with the Model S and X, then you have the option to hedge your bets by buying the replacement warrantee.

Commented On: Payback On Plug-Ins: Finance Commentator Misses The Point


Green Car Reports 0 Views 18 comments
Not necessarily. First of all, compared to the early adoption of hybrids in the US, the Leaf, Volt and i-MiEV sales are way ahead of the curve. The Leaf and Volt sales, etc., are not "pitifully tiny".

EVs are cheaper in the long run, and anyone that does the math will see that. The problem is initial cost. Particularly in this tough economy, there are people, and I know some, that want to buy a plug-in vehicle, but the up-front sticker price is too much. Not by much, but enough. That's a lot of money to finance a Volt compared to a Cruze, for example.

The tax credit is received upon filing taxes and waiting for the credit. The full amount, minus a down-payment, needs to be financed up front. A point-of-sale rebate would help.

Commented On: 3-Cylinder 2014 Ford Focus EcoBoost To Deliver 50 MPG-Plus?


Green Car Reports 0 Views 7 comments
I was not aware of the differences between the two engines. Makes sense.

I am aware of hybrid operation, owning the 2010 Mariner hybrid myself. I like it much better than stop/start tech, but I appreciate the fact that stop/start is much cheaper, and that stop/start features on ICE cars will make a significant difference in fuel consumption and emissions particularly in urban and suburban environs.

Commented On: 2012 Ford Focus Battery Pack Cost: $12,000-$15,000, Says CEO


Green Car Reports 0 Views 9 comments
Well, to be nitpicky, the cells used in the Roadster are literally laptop cells. The cells used in the Model S are the same form factor, the cylindrical 18650, but the chemistry inside is different, developed with Panasonic specifically for EV use. The 40kWh and 60kWh packs supposedly use one version, and the 85kWh pack uses the next generation. I do not have a link for that info anymore...it came out a while ago. It is suspected, based on what CEO Musk has said, that the 3rd generation platform (mass market platform, the sedan is due out in 2015) will be using a new generation of cells that are better than the ones in the 85kWh pack.

Commented On: 3-Cylinder 2014 Ford Focus EcoBoost To Deliver 50 MPG-Plus?


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Since Ford is including stop/start with the 1.6L EcoBoost option in the 2013 Fusion, why didn't they use it in the hybrids, as well, instead of going with a new 2.0L Atkinson? Why develop a new engine (discontinuing the 2.5L Atkinson in current Ford hybrids) when the 1.6L EcoBoost appears to be able to handle a significant number of stop/start cycles?

Commented On: Ford Transit Van With EcoBoost V-6 To Replace Aged E-Series


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This is great news. The old 5.4L V8 is weak and thirsty, and even the new 5.0L V8 is inferior to the 3.5L V6 EcoBoost. With a little luck Ford will do the same for the Expedition/Navigator (it would be better if Ford just discontinued the latter two, but that's probably a bit naive on my part).

Commented On: Small Four-Cylinder Engines Are Here To Stay


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It is interesting how Ford's V6 EcoBoost (at least, the version in the F-150 with the higher torque) is superior in hp, torque and mpg to the current 5.0L V8, yet, the 5.0L is still an option in the F-150 and Mustang GT (no EcoBoost options for the Mustang as yet). Worse yet, the Expedition/Navigator still has a 5.4L V8 that is even weaker than the current 5L V8 with poorer mpg.

Commented On: Higher Gas Prices Don't Change Buyers' New-Car Choices Much


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I am not a fan of gas taxes. Just more self-destructive tax policies by screwing over all of us that have to work for a living (the 99%, for example). Supply and Demand are quite clear on the fact that gas/diesel will continue to rise painfully fast, without any increase in existing gas taxes.
For the same reason, I am not a fan of a carbon tax. Amusing how the powerbrokers and wealthy tout a carbon tax (it won't hurt them one bit), but again will just grind the economic heel harder into the faces of the rest of us.
A cap-and-trade system is necessary. It worked, and still works, dramatically well for curbing acid-rain related emissions. We need the same for the other emissions. There is plenty of money to be made and to fund improvements, while any remaining costs are not, cannot, be passed onto the consumer in any substantial ammount due to economics.

Commented On: Higher Gas Prices Don't Change Buyers' New-Car Choices Much


Green Car Reports 0 Views 15 comments
2nd paragraph: "there", not "their"

Commented On: Higher Gas Prices Don't Change Buyers' New-Car Choices Much


Green Car Reports 0 Views 15 comments
Nobody is forcing anyone to buy a certain type of vehicle. That's the whole point of regulations. Regulations set specific boundaries or limits on performance: pollute no more than "X" amount; be able to go "Y" miles on a gallon of gas/diesel; etc.

Nowhere in these regulations are their requirements on HOW to comply. Any industry (in this case, automakers) are free to solve the problem by any one or more methods. The law has no interest in establishing "how". All that matters is that the regulations are met.

These regulations establish necessary limits on the damage we do to ourselves. This is damage that doesn't manifest directly in up-front costs such that the Almighty Free Market can protect us.
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