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Commented On: 2014 BMW i3 Electric Car: Full Details And Images Released


Green Car Reports 0 Views 66 comments
John, agreed and understood. That said, we crunched a few numbers in a conversation on TMC and the upshot is that given the weight of the vehicle, and the implied aerodynamics, the REx should be able to propel the car up a 6% grade at 45 mph. Assuming that the battery won’t be fully depleted, it might be used to augment on steeper inclines. I'm fairly confident in those numbers. Let's see what the various road tests will reveal.

Commented On: 2014 BMW i3 Electric Car: Full Details And Images Released


Green Car Reports 0 Views 66 comments
Jay Cole was able to unearth that the REx option weighs 259 lbs and not 330 lbs. this data came straight from BMW. The press release was incorrect.

Commented On: Battery Life In Tesla Roadster Is Likely Better Than Predicted


Green Car Reports 0 Views 6 comments
Perhaps the high replacement rate is indicative of a battery pack issue reported early on.

Commented On: 2014 BMW i3 Electric Car: Specifications And Details Released


Green Car Reports 0 Views 21 comments
Prior reports and spy shot indicate a presence of a small frunk. There is some space set aside for the range extender next to the EV drivetrain. A small gas tank will be added in the font, and will likely encroach on the limited frunk space under the hood.

http://bit.ly/Vuibdz

Commented On: 2014 BMW i3 Electric Car: Specifications And Details Released


Green Car Reports 0 Views 21 comments
Power is sent to the rear wheels through a single- speed transmission, allowing the BMW i3 to accelerate with an uninterrupted flow of power up to its top speed, which is limited to 150 km/h (93 mph) in the interests of efficiency.

http://bit.ly/bmwi3en

Commented On: Battery Leasing Lands In U.S., Electric Smart Drivers Love It


Green Car Reports 0 Views 5 comments
Cherie, can a replacement battery be purchased or leasing the only option when a new battery is needed and not covered by warranty for whatever reason.

Commented On: Nissan Leaf Electric Car Boosts Nissan's Brand Image, Reputation


Green Car Reports 0 Views 72 comments
Point taken Matt, but would you please substantiate your 99.8%? Yes, John should probably find a different platform for voicing his opinion, but is that reason enough to stop minding our manners?

Commented On: Nissan Leaf Electric Car Boosts Nissan's Brand Image, Reputation


Green Car Reports 0 Views 72 comments
Matt, it's very good to hear that your LEAF is performing great. From what I've gathered, you live in the Seattle metro area. Based on what we have seen so far, the LEAF is expected to do well there, and your comment seems to confirm that. While we can agree or disagree with the choices other EV drivers make, it's very difficult to generalize when no data is available. That said, sometimes I wish that the discussion in the blogosphere was less biased and confrontational. While everyone's opinion matters, it's not likely that one negative comment has the potential of killing the EV movement. Conversely, a great comment is unlikely to convert the rest of the nation to go buy an EV tomorrow. I think we are mostly preaching to the choir here.

Commented On: BMW CEO To Germans: Get Over Your Angst, Buy Electric Cars Already!


Green Car Reports 0 Views 11 comments
That's fair criticism, I believe. Market conditions are different in Germany than here in the US. Renault Twizy has done remarkably well there for a reason. Unfortunately, it does not count towards the sales volume of EVs, since it's technically a quadricycle. Another interesting trend is the wide adoption of e-bikes by commuters and city dwellers. They are much cheaper to operate than a car, and more sustainable too. The BMW i3 could do well in Germany. It's still one of the largest car markets, and many people love their vehicles. I believe those are the clients Mr. Reithofer was wooing in his speech.

Commented On: Six New Plug-In Electric Cars Coming For 2014


Green Car Reports 0 Views 40 comments
On the topic of carbon fibre: you appear to be referring to their high purchase cost, which is fair and indisputable. That said, have you ever had a serious repair performed and did you compare the cost of repairing a carbon fiber frame or sheet to more conventional methods? I have, and based on my personal experience, the traditional metal part would have to be replaced in its entirety and the carbon product was patched. The cost of patching was much less than the cost of full replacement. If this transfers to carbon-based production automobiles remains to be seen, but given some of the experience in racing, there is a chance that this will work out quite well. My comment above was prompting you to base your arguments on data, not opinion.
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